Bristling Brock speaks out...

 

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With yet another government defeat in the Commons overshadowing the possible outcome of the Brexit process the PM has resolved to return to Brussels to secure meaningful changes to the backstop part of her Withdrawal Agreement.  She, and many pundits, believe that an improvement in these terms and acceptance of the UK's option to exercise it unilaterally, will be singularly sufficient to get the Withdrawal Agreement approved by parliament.

Now this is where Bristling Brock continues to disagree.   It seem incredulous that the Irish border backstop debate has (a) ever even occurred, and (b) that it has been allowed to completely swamp the wider essence of what Brexit was fully about.   Brexit is not, and never has been, a singular issue.   The reasons for the leave vote are as diverse as that of any other significant cause and range between spontaneous choices through to very reasoned and constructive ones.  They all underpin the ethos of Brexit - we didn't all vote for leaving by virtue of the same determination but we did all vote to leave to bring about a sea change in the way our country was to be run in the future, how our vote mattered and how self determination in world affairs was our prerogative and not that of the EU.   The Irish backstop is no more than an issue created by bad negotiation and an inept and misguided positioning of Britain as being the party that would do all the 'giving' and the EU all the 'taking'.  Those who disagree with the leave vote will no doubt cast scorn upon the philosophical nature of the true Brexit movement but, if they look carefully at their own arguments for staying in the EU, they are likely to find that they are equally philosophical rather than the pragmatic label they would like to have pinned to them.

The Leave vote is being betrayed by the government.  It's a matter of opinion as to whether this is deliberate or just inefficient governance - at this stage it hardly matters anymore.  What does matter, ironically, is that such a betrayal may well ignite the very forces that the government has striven to dupe and marginalise - bringing about the very beginnings of political change that they hoped to undermine originally.   Neither of the main political party's in Westminster have gone through this Brexit pipeline with any dignity, honesty or candour and BB would wager that both will see the consequences of this whenever the next election falls.   The electorate will not forget such a monumental abrogation of national responsibility.   Add to this the very imminent European elections and, even now, we are seeing the building blocks of a very different spectrum of political thought being prepared and, more importantly, likely to succeed.  Add further the malaise of the Eurozone currency and we can already see the widening cracks in its stability and usefulness, urged along by those economies that have suffered significantly under its prescriptive regulation.  In short, the EU is not 'the safe pair of hands' that many Remainers might imagine and its future prosperity is far from assured.

And then we come to the Brexit Party.   It's hard to see any evidence of this newish political organisation if you rely on the BBC or some of the tabloid and broadsheet papers for news and information.   It has, for many practical purposes been made a 'non-news' item.  Why would this be so ?  Could it be because it is trying to coalesce the Leave forces into a meaningful voice against the clear bad will the government has fired at the essence of Brexit or could it be because a certain Mr Farage has hoisted his flag amidst them ?  Mr Farage attracts all sorts of attention and is much scorned by those who don't understand him (or even wish to understand him) but one thing about him is undeniable.  For a good number of years he has resolutely campaigned on Britain's behalf in the European parliament.  He has railed against the EU's bureaucracy, red-tape, inflexible rules and many of the unelected personalities at the EU's top table.  In this he has undoubtedly made enemies, but BB suspects he's found a good many more who either overtly or covertly support his unending critique of that which is bad in the EU.   BB makes no specific case for Mr Farage being a one-man political wonder, but he is the only politician who is actually arguing the case for Britain rather than the partisan bumblings of the two main political entities in Westminster.  He has his faults like anyone but right now BB would sooner have Mr Farage on side than any of the characters currently inhabiting Downing Street or Westminster Palace.  His energy, passion for Britain and sheer tenacity of purpose make him the best qualified ally to nurture.  Go fo it !   You're the only one likely to make Brexit work as it was intended....