Bristling Brock speaks out...

 

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It seems incredulous that the major political party's in Britain are still obsessed with themselves and their survival despite probably the largest surge of public opinion expressing dissatisfaction, distrust and contempt for their respective incumbents ever seen in a British popular uprising. 

Conservative associations are demanding the PM must go, Labour realists are desperately trying to get back to a centre-left position rather than Corbyn's Marxist far left ideal, the Lib Dems frankly haven't a clue what they want to be and Scottish Nationalists are facing a drubbing should an early election be called.  This is the political status quo that by one means or another runs this country and none of them, absolutely none, have any notion of reform that would enable the right people with the right moral character and the right commitment to doing what is right actually come to the fore.  The feeding trough is already crowded with the arrogant, the stupid, the misguided, the blinkered, the over-privileged and the downright ineffective.  And that is what the status quo want to preserve - that is, in fact the very meaning of the term 'status quo' - more of the same for the benefit of the few who are already at the trough.  Change ?  Why on earth would these individuals vote for that ?  Why would they vote themselves out of a lucrative sinecure, of becoming TV personalities, of securing company directorships and prepping themselves for a future on the academic lecture circuit ?  The answer, simply of course, is that they wouldn't and in reality aren't either.   There is no honour in our political leadership, there is no moral high ground that they even aspire to nowadays, there is very little political skill and an almost total absence of the concept of serving the people - but there is a very nasty whiff of self-preservation that pervades government, parliament and, indeed, the civil service - the very core of the establishment and the status quo.  And that whiff is getting more vile by the day.

Whilst much of this has been heightened by the astonishingly poor handling of Brexit, the tip of a deeper and more profound iceberg of dissatisfaction, we as a population have been highly vocal in expressing that dissatisfaction (with all political entities) but broadly apathetic when it comes down to instigating meaningful change (to borrow the popular phrase from Mr Bercow) and dynamically push for the process of change to be initiated.  Commentators argue that an election now would divide the country even further and, by extension, it wouldn't be the best thing to do to bring Brexit about - but they are wrong because they argue from the position of the status quo - yes it would drop a bombshell upon the establishment, it would shake up the political landscape markedly and bring a raft of new perspectives into how government should work and deliver its promises - and that is important because not everything is about Brexit !  The public dissatisfaction with what we have currently is also about how domestic and foreign policies are thought through and delivered, how we balance service provision with revenue, about how we control our own national decision making, about how we address the 21st century as a proud and independent nation state and about how we regain our international respect.  That is infinitely deeper than the absurdity of the Brexit options we are now faced with.

It is clear the PM must go and soon.   Ideally it would be a good idea for Labour to oust Corbyn and his scary acolytes too, but that is less likely.  A second referendum on Brexit would solve nothing and the consequence of that would be an ongoing perpetuity of membership of the EU - and that would in no way address the rising bile of the nation against how it is governed and by whom. An EU election is neither here nor there - the same principles of political change apply to our representatives there - and be under no illusion that our current governmental direction will yoke us to the EU for a long, long time.

Nobody relishes an election, but the reality is that that is the only way to start the ball rolling if we are to aspire to a level of change that is reflected down from government to grass roots levels.  And that change has to rise from deep in the social belly of this country; it is not solely a governmental choice; it is now very much in the domain of those that care about what happens to Britain - and that includes you and me.  Such change won't be easy, and there could well be some national pain in the short-term, but unless we strive to get men and women of character and probity running our affairs, we will only have ourselves to blame for the continuity that the status quo yearn for.