Bristling Brock speaks out...

 

  • A
  • Atom
  • Manhatten
  • News
  • Thames

Please click on the article's title to share or comment on an item

Pin It

 

As the clock ticks inexorably toward the European parliamentary elections in a little over a weeks time, Bristling Brock looks on at the conduct and behaviours of our most senior politicians and concludes that they have learned nothing from the experiences and traumas of the recent past.

It is still clear that preservation of both the Conservative and Labour parties is uppermost in their minds.  There is next to no evidence that they have listened to the uproar of public and business opinion about their conduct record in bringing Brexit about - indeed, Tom Watson has today indicated that the talks between Labour and Tory guru's over how to reach a deal are not based upon any such deal that might be best for this country rather they are being conducted along the lines of how to minimise the damage to their respective party images.   The 'deal' - if ever there is one - is anything that will squeeze itself past a parliamentary approval vote.  If there was ever any doubt about the motive forces behind our political class then this is a class example of bad faith, duplicity, self-interest and sheer abrogation of any sense of democratic process.  If this is truly what is going on in these interminable meetings where the government repeatedly claims 'constructive discussions' then they should all hang their heads in shame.  We all know, however, that the politicos do not even recognise this critique - their belief in their own salvation is equated with the salvation of the country.  How crackpot can we allow our politicians to continue behaving if this is typical of their outlook ?

BB is also drawn to the political interviews held over the weekend - always the juiciest.  The one that struck a chord was that whilst most Labour and Tory politicians were tasked with discussing - wrong word, maybe I should have said 'promoting their own and party stylised views' - the implications of Brexit, second referendums and no-deals, the harangue launched at Nigel Farage and the Brexit Party was eyebrow twitching.  BB supposes that the stablishment also includes the main tv broadcasters where there seems to be a coordinated desire to pour disdain, criticism and scorn upon this new political entity.  Even the courtesies of Mr, Mrs or Ms are denied Nigel Farage and his colleagues - everyone is almost encouraged to refer to him as 'Farage' in a tone that registers contempt and dismissal.   Whatever the Brexit Party may or may not be, it should be treated respectfully and allowed its part in the discourse.  What its detractors are playing in this manner is an attempt to denegrate a legitimate contender in the electoral process, the so-called democratic electoral process, the very institutional pillar we are trying to uphold, by snide and juvenile quips.  But that is what we've come to expect from the establishment - utterly base and juvenile conduct bleating from prescribed scripts like well trained sheep.  The BBC in particular should have a good look at itself before it tries to take the moral high ground.  If for no other reason - and BB has plenty of those - he wishes Mr Farage well in the forthcoming elections so that our precious and corrupted establishment of metro-elites can be utterly thrashed.

Now BB's critics might say that aspiration is no different to the politicos harking on about party preservation.  It is different insofar as this country needs to give free and equal expression to political opinions - whether we like them or not - so that the electorate can make a judgement on what it is they vote for.  Media bias benefits only those that control it, not you or me.  Mr Farage has a political position and by his own admission has no aspiration to govern this country - he is a catalyst, a fuse to ignite the forces of change that our political system so desperately needs.  In that role he has a right to be as heard as any other politician.  If the political change we need should embrace the large, institutionalised media giants, so be it - for they are part of the systemic demise of democracy in this country.