Bristling Brock speaks out...

 

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When we thought politics had reached the zenith of absurdity it has demonstrated an unyielding capacity to dredge the depths of incredulous behaviour.   Not only is it doing so just in Britain but continues in the US, across Europe and countless other places.   We might draw the conclusion that politics is a malign process designed to numb our global brains - and in that, many of the perpetrators are succeeding.

Brexit is in a state of hiatus awaiting Theresa May's departure next week and the now tedious and dispiriting antics of the biggest range of wannabbee prime ministers the Tory Party has ever mustered are being launched at us from every media platform - including this one !  There's no doubt that the election of a new Conservative leader has stirred the interest of a stream of candidates ranging from the utterly useless to the moderately acceptable.  Whatever the outcome we'll still have a Tory at the helm until the next general election.  Each candidate is grandstanding their heartfelt view about how Brexit should be managed hereon, though Bristling Brock doubts any of them truly have a coherent battle plan to drag it to a culmination that will be as the referendum intended.  Nevertheless, it is a measure of the chaos that is beginning to be recognised by the political class - very late, very late indeed.

The Brexit Party, basking in the successes of the EU elections, is now pitching to win a British parliamentary seat in the upcoming Peterborough by-election.  The odds are looking very much like they may win it, thrashing the previous Labour stronghold quite soundly.  It signals the move from a European parliamentary base to a British one and we may all suspect that on a nationwide basis there might just be the possibility of this new kid on the block making substantial inroads into the fortress of the establishment.  It would be no bad thing if such a presence crystallized the outlook and behaviour of Westminster to view Britain as a whole rather than its current London-centric and warped view of what the nation expects from its governance.

Trumpy has raised the concept of honesty to new heights of disbelief.  I am reminded of a famous phrase delivered by Sharon Stone in the film, 'Basic Instinct' where she pronounced that her writing MO was to create the 'suspension of disbelief'.  That is where old Trumpy has now reached.   What was black is white and what was white is black and bouncing back and forth between truth and downright lies seems perfectly acceptable to him - if nobody else.  It has almost reached a state of normality for Mr Trump to manoeuvre 180 degrees in his declarations, day after day.  Nobody believes him but neither is there a meaningful way of removing him from office.  The Democrats are twitchy about the legalities of impeachment to the extent that they are now pinning their hopes upon the 2020 elections as being the best way to oust him.   They overlook the fact that they have no great candidates themselves and that Trumpy retains a core support from the redneck belts across the US.  And they outnumber the suave metro types in Washington many times over.  On the matter of Trumpy's forthcoming state visit to Britain we can all look forward to some outrageous and alarming rhetoric - at least that beats the grey drab of British politics.

Europe also is on the cusp of EU elections for the top jobs though it's hard to imagine any of them really stirring up much interest as the elections come from within the EU's institutions to create yet another tranche of unelected (by the public) officials.  Not exciting stuff but it may be the moment when the disaffected nations of the EU - Poland, Hungary, Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain notably - make their move to bring about substantive pressure for reform.  Much as the media deride the rise of so called 'populism' the reality is that whatever you may choose to call it, there is a significant level of national and institutional grievance that the future EU (should it survive) will have to face up to.  Like it or not, we're in for a decade of political upheaval.

D-Day's 75th anniversary is almost upon us and only a handful of veterans are still around to remind us of the importance of that event.  We should all reflect that we wouldn't be here today enjoying the freedoms we do if it was not for the success of that day in history.  Dreadful as war maybe, we should be thankful that it took place and never forget the losses that made it so.