Bristling Brock speaks out...

 

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Corona and Brexit issues are on something of a collision course.   Both are highly demanding governmental issues but they raise the question of whether two critical issues occurring simultaneously can ever be fully addressed by a democratic government system.  Within that last statement there is the recognition that multiple issues can be addressed by government when it is not strictly held to account by either Opposition, business or social factions - as was the case in WW2 under a coalition government and a broadly supportive public - but under peacetime circumstances and with an elevated level of civil interference with government decisions and proposed choices the processes of policy making and their implementation are distinctly impacted.

Our world, our society is defined by the plethora of civil rights, legislative rights and human rights terms and conditions by which a democratic, free speech social structure is perceived and operated.   Government is hamstrung by the influences of - for want of a name - lobby group interests that by the nature of how our society has evolved, have a freedom to interfere with the very processes of governance on a whole new level.  We could argue that this is a healthy dynamic, the democratic mechanism truly at work, government of the people by the people.  In principle that is a noble achievement and one that shouldn't be entirely dismissed - but - what happens when the very substance of governance is so subjected to such a multitude of external interferences that its choices and decisions end up as an incoherent and unfocussed strategy and direction that achieve little ?

Getting the balance right is unquestionably difficult given the range of freedoms that social, political and business groupings now have.  Identifying those lobby groups that are genuine, constructive and engaged with government as compared with those that are subversive is equally difficult but incredibly important to define - for we are at the mercy of vested interests that do not always have the wider well-being of our society at heart.  It is equally the case that political influencers from outside our shores subversively support those amongst us who are driven by their unshakable conviction they have in a progressive, fair and equal society.  That these people, aided and abetted by home-grown agitators, are either complicit in becoming the destructive tools of external influencers or immune to understanding how they are being manipulated is an open question.  Yet it creates an anarchic environment that achieves exactly what the instigators require - chaos.    

Government needs leadership and a robust constitution to listen to the genuine and actively discard and marginalise the malign.  It takes nerve, it takes conviction in a course of action and it requires a sometimes hard reaction to some of the lobby interests that assail it.   It is because we are free that we have this dilemma - closed societies do not have either the luxury or the challenge of diverse interests interposing themselves upon government policy - so we might regard it as a self imposed burden, some sort of masochism even.  It is the price of evolving democracy (for we haven't reached the zenith of that by a long shot).  Our government need to demonstrate purpose and leadership in the knowledge that their choices will never please everybody; but unless this becomes far more evident trend, we will forever be pulled this way and that and achieve little as a result.  It will divide, weaken and undermine our society - the very objective of the Putin's and Xi Jinping's of this world.   Strength and purpose have their place.   Our government needs to get steely, resolute and demonstrate who is in power - the democratically elected government of the UK.