Bristling Brock speaks out...

 

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Spades out of the sheds everyone !   Never mind the flowerbeds, plough them up and start planting vegetables - and sing good old British songs whilst you do it...

Chris Grayling’s bizarre assertion that if Brexit turns into a no deal situation then our farmers could ‘just grow more food’ illustrates the absolute naïveté of the government.  Having spent decades running our agricultural and industrial capacities down he thinks the simple solution to an EU tariff barrier would be to turn a tap and, hey-presto, more British food suddenly lines the shelves of our shops.  Whilst the sentiment of gearing up our own domestic production is sensible, it would take a considerable amount of time for it to percolate through to consumers.  I’m not against Britain becoming more independent and self sufficient, far from it, but that process requires preparation, infrastructure changes and many other features that would become part of a no-deal scenario - and it would take time to implement.  We now have around 17 months left before the Brexit deadline.  Whilst the government have belatedly said they will now plan for such a no-deal, there is still squabbling within the cabinet as to where the money for this will come from, if anywhere.  In short, this no-deal planning should have started long ago - as most of us outside of government would have expected.

This is but the tip of the iceberg.  The same level of thinking can be seen across the spectrum of subjects raised by the Brexit phenomena.  Government confusion, disagreement and outright rebellion are characteristics of poor preparation for Brexit.  The reality, of course, is that the government never even imagined Brexit would be voted for, such was their blinkered view of the realities of life around Britain.  Their arrogance blinded them to even the remotest possibility of Britain voting to leave the EU.  And now their true colours are on show.  Their position is ridiculous insofar as most of the cabinet and half of its MP’s are ideologically against the very idea of leaving the EU.  So how on earth do they imagine that they are going to negotiate a good deal for Britain when heart and soul are not an integral part of that dynamic ?  The answer is plain for us all to see - they are failing miserably at the negotiating table and they are failing because they are trying to do something that they have no feel for, no passion for, no instinctive desire for.  We have the wrong team negotiating for Britain.

But little is likely to change the set-up of Britain’s negotiating team.  The very nature of party politics means that we will exclude other, sometimes more qualified and able folk from other political or even quasi-political structures, to participate in and contribute to the negotiations.   And at a time like this I label that as not only a tragedy but a miscarriage of justice and common sense.  Just why would any good government exclude able contributors from elsewhere in the political or business world from being involved in this ?  This should be a matter way above Party considerations, it is about the future of our nation, the way our governance should be approached and the way in which we hold ourselves upright in the world with dignity and integrity.   I’m more than a little sure that our government (and probably most other Party driven politico’s who would be governments) have no interest in the more subtle values of good governance unless they coincide with their own Party considerations.  We, as the electorate, have to think hard about what can be done to change this highly flawed mechanism in Westminster.

Elsewhere, the world still seems to co-exist with chaos and complacency.  Much of that is attributable to the increasingly instant news of what’s going on around the globe.  Before, we just didn’t know.  Now, we have global news in our faces all day long.  That may be defined as progress or it may also be looked at as being an excessive inundation of information that is hard to process into any sort of meaningfulness.  Does it create an immunity to our feelings over some world events, purely because we are seeing and hearing about so many tragic occurrences ?  News is not the only factor, of course, as many others also impact upon how we formulate our opinions and positions but it does have a significant role in all our lives and there is a responsibility amongst those who spread it to operate to high standards of integrity.  Wishful thinking, perhaps.